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Waterford Council Lifeguards go Blue for World Drowning Prevention Day

85 People drowned in Ireland in 2022.  Help reduce these numbers by following the basic principles for staying safe in and around water.

  1. Swim at Lifeguarded waterways.
  2.  If you cannot get to a lifeguarded waterway, swim where it is traditionally known to be safe and where ringbuoys are available.
  3. Always swim and stay within your depth.
  4. Children should always be supervised in or around water.
  5. Never use inflatable toys on open water
  6. Never mix alcohol with water based activities.
  7. Never swim in quarries or reservoirs
  8. When boating always wear a correctly fitted life jacket and carry a means of communication.
  9. To escape a Rip Current swim parallel to the shore.
  10. In an emergency dial 112 and ask for the coastguard.

Mark World Drowning Prevention Day by doing one thing, improving one thing and adding one thing. Learn one water safety skill. Share one piece of water safety advice. Change one mind about safety around water. Be the one who takes responsibility, because for someone at risk of drowning, your one thing could mean the world.

#drowningprevention

For further information visit www.watersafety.ie

Minister for Justice launches Waterford’s Safety Plan

On Monday March 27th, Minister for Justice Simon Harris TD launched the Waterford Local Community Safety Partnership (WLCSP) Safety Plan 2023 – 2028.

The plan included a detailed socio-economic profile of the City and County, which was used to inform the development of objectives and actions to 2028.

 

Speaking at the launch Mayor of Waterford City and County, Cllr. John O’Leary said, “I am proud that Waterford City and County is one of the chosen locations for the Local Community Safety Partnership pilot.

“Community safety, as we all know is more than just policing crime. It is about people enjoying a better quality of life and feeling safe within their communities. The role of the new Waterford Community Safety Partnership is to work together with various communities and to deliver on their individual localised needs.”

To help the Partnership better understand the Community Safety landscape in County Waterford, extensive public consultation was undertaken between July and October 2022.

Eleven thousand Waterford people were reached through a social media campaign, supported by online surveys, paper surveys, focus groups and a hugely popular series of on street ‘pop up’ consultation sessions in Cappoquin, Dungarvan, Kilmacthomas, Portlaw, the Greenway, Tramore, Dunmore East and the city centre.

Findings from the consultations found that the majority of participants felt safe in Waterford. This is consistent with official data and past surveys, and reports which all suggest Waterford is one of the safest and most desirable places to live and work in Ireland.

However, the results also found that Waterford is not exempt from the issues which give rise to community concerns and adverse perceptions by individuals about personal safety

Commenting on the Plan, Minister Simon Harris stressed that community safety is about people being and feeling safe in the heart of their own communities.

“I have to congratulate the WLCSP on developing a robust Safety Plan, with input from every corner of the County, that will through collaborative actions prevent and deter crime and harmful behaviours whilst addressing many broader contributary factors such as improved access to education, tackling substance misuse, and confronting illegal drug dealing and intimidation.

“This Safety Plan will ensure that communities in Waterford can thrive, flourish, and live the fullest lives possible” the Minister concluded.

The WLCSP concept is a new ‘whole of government’ initiative which brings together thirty members from statutory services, the voluntary and community sector, local councillors, and community members to work together to identify and tackle community safety issues locally. Waterford City and County is one of three areas being piloted in the Country, alongside Longford County and North Dublin Inner City.

Reflecting on the plan, Sean Aylward Chair of the WLCSP emphasised that the Waterford Safety Plan aims to address the social and infrastructural issues in the County on many fronts, through collaboration.

“Our actions, after listening to those who contributed will include, but are not limited to, requesting a review of the legal operating context for CCTV, enhanced multi-agency collaboration for tackling substance misuse and confronting illegal drug dealing and intimidation, tackling the related Anti-Social Behaviour and crime and supporting a review of local youth services to explore the increased provision of spaces for our teenagers to ‘hang out’.

“The Plan also intends to address the more hidden challenges in the community such as phishing, domestic violence and gender-based violence through initiatives being brought forward by our members.”

The eighty-page document has been produced primarily for consultation on line at https://www.waterfordcouncil.ie/departments/community-sport/community-safety.htm but was launched in hard copy and will be available in time in other languages.

All members of the Partnership are committed to the success of this collaborative pilot initiative and would like to thank all the people of Waterford, who contributed.

 

Fire Safety Week : Chimneys & Stoves

Chimney fire signs
• A chimney fire produces excessive smoke.
• Burning embers may fall down the chimney.
• Flames or sparks may be visible from the top of the chimney.
• A loud roaring noise may be audible.

A chimney fire can turn into a house fire if not dealt with!

If a fire breaks out in your chimney or stove
• Get out.
• Call 112 or 999 without delay.
• Ask for the fire Service.
• Speak calmly and clearly.
• Give your address and phone number. If you are calling on your mobile, say what county you are in.
• Only hang up when the operator tells you to.
• Stay out.

 

It’s National Fire Safety Week – test your smoke alarm

In their annual safety campaigns around Fire Safety Week, Waterford Fire Service is once again urging people to be vigilant of fire risks in their homes, with a special emphasis on testing your smoke alarm.

Fire Safety Week takes place this year from October 17th to 23rd, with the campaign focus encouraging all homes to have working smoke alarms and to test them weekly.

The annual awareness and safety campaign is jointly run with the Northern Ireland Fire and Rescue Service to enhance fire safety across the island, particularly in the home, with a campaign slogan of “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives – Have you a plan if yours goes off!”

Speaking on the importance of having proper equipment in your home, Senior Assistant Chief Fire Officer, Colin Barden said, “It is a worrying statistic that, on average, 25 people die in fires in Ireland each year. We are encouraging homeowners to act now to keep themselves and their families safe. The importance of having a plan of action, should a fire occur, cannot be overstated.”

“Householders should check that their smoke alarms are fitted properly, are working and test them regularly. We can’t rely on our sense of smell when we are asleep, in fact smoke can put you in a deeper sleep, so you are relying on an alarm to wake you.”

Tuesday October 18th has been designated “Smoke Alarm Day” with special emphasis online and on social media channels across Ireland’s local authorities.

Chief Fire Officer with Waterford Fire Service, Niall Curtin outlined how continuous changes in our living environment mean we need keep reconsidering fire safety in the home.

“Post Covid, many of us are now spending more time at home so it is more important than ever that we are informed as to the steps we can take to protect ourselves and our homes from fire. This is also true at times, such as the upcoming Halloween and Christmas celebrations, when there may be additional risks in our homes such as increased fire load with sources of ignition such as candles and temporary festive lighting.”

For maximum protection one smoke alarm per room is recommended by the Fire Service, with the exception of the bathroom, kitchen and garage.

Heat detectors can also be considered in kitchens where fumes from cooking could lead to unwanted alarm activations. For minimum protection one smoke alarm for each level/floor of your home located in the hallway and landing is necessary.

To find out about how a working smoke alarm can save your life visit www.firesafetyweek.ie or keep an eye out for the hashtags #22FSW, #STOPFIRE and #SmokeAlarmsSaveLives on social media.

Waterford Fire Service urges public test smoke alarms during National Fire Safety Week

In the run up to the annual safety campaigns around Fire Safety Week, Waterford Fire Service is once again urging people to be vigilant of fire risks in their homes, with a special emphasis on testing your smoke alarm.

Fire Safety Week takes place this year from October 17th to 23rd, with the campaign focus encouraging all homes to have working smoke alarms and to test them weekly.

The annual awareness and safety campaign is jointly run with the Northern Ireland Fire and Rescue Service to enhance fire safety across the island, particularly in the home, with a campaign slogan of “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives – Have you a plan if yours goes off!”

Speaking on the importance of having proper equipment in your home, Senior Assistant Chief Fire Officer, Colin Barden said, “It is a worrying statistic that, on average, 25 people die in fires in Ireland each year. We are encouraging homeowners to act now to keep themselves and their families safe. The importance of having a plan of action, should a fire occur, cannot be overstated.”

“Householders should check that their smoke alarms are fitted properly, are working and test them regularly. We can’t rely on our sense of smell when we are asleep, in fact smoke can put you in a deeper sleep, so you are relying on an alarm to wake you.”

Tuesday October 18th has been designated “Smoke Alarm Day” with special emphasis online and on social media channels across Ireland’s local authorities.

Chief Fire Officer with Waterford Fire Service, Niall Curtin outlined how continuous changes in our living environment mean we need keep reconsidering fire safety in the home.

“Post Covid, many of us are now spending more time at home so it is more important than ever that we are informed as to the steps we can take to protect ourselves and our homes from fire. This is also true at times, such as the upcoming Halloween and Christmas celebrations, when there may be additional risks in our homes such as increased fire load with sources of ignition such as candles and temporary festive lighting.”

For maximum protection one smoke alarm per room is recommended by the Fire Service, with the exception of the bathroom, kitchen and garage.

Heat detectors can also be considered in kitchens where fumes from cooking could lead to unwanted alarm activations. For minimum protection one smoke alarm for each level/floor of your home located in the hallway and landing is necessary.

To find out about how a working smoke alarm can save your life visit www.firesafetyweek.ie or keep an eye out for the hashtags #22FSW, #STOPFIRE and #SmokeAlarmsSaveLives on social media.

More than 24000 people in Waterford using the toilet as a bin

Clean Coasts and Irish Water urge the public to ‘Think Before You Flush’ in a bid to safeguard our environment

 Monday 3 October 2022: Irish Water and Clean Coasts are urging the public to continue to ‘Think Before You Flush’ as a recent survey has revealed that more than 24,000 people living in Waterford continue to regularly flush wipes and other sanitary items down the toilet. Worryingly those aged under 35 are twice as likely to dispose of ‘flushable’ wipes down the toilet, compared to those aged over 35. No wipes whether marked ‘flushable’ or not should be flushed down the toilet.

With sea swimming and the use of our beaches increasingly popular all year-round, it’s a timely reminder that our flushing behaviour has a direct impact on the environment and that making small changes can help prevent sanitary waste ending up on Ireland’s sandy beaches, rocky shores and secluded bays.

A new campaign video targeting under 35 years olds aims to connect with this audience in way that encourages real behavioural change.

Broadcaster Bláthnaid Treacy who is also supporting the campaign, said: “I am delighted to support the ‘Think Before You Flush’ campaign. For me, it is important that we all play a positive role when it comes protecting the environment. Collectively, small changes can have a huge impact so I would encourage everyone to consider their flushing habits. It is simple really, just ‘Think Before You Flush’.

Speaking about the survey results Ian O’Mahony, Irish Water said: “In 2018, our research informed us that 36% of people living in Ireland were regularly flushing the wrong things down the toilet. Irish Water have been working in partnership with Clean Coasts on the ‘Think Before You Flush’ campaign and during this time, we have made significant progress, as this figure has now reduced to 21%.

Whilst this represents a 42% improvement in people’s flushing behaviour, it still represents almost a million people nationally using the toilet as a bin: that’s more than 24,000 people living in Co. Waterford. The impacts of flushing the wrong things down the toilet are clear to see, as we are still removing thousands of sewer blockages from our network every month and continue to see this waste ending up on our beaches”.

“Following the latest survey findings, we have a call to action to those aged 35 and under in particular to be mindful of their flushing behaviour as this age profile can really help make the difference. We are keen to remind people that wipes should never be flushed down the toilet even if they are labelled as ‘flushable’. The impact of this waste ending up in our natural environment, on our beaches, shores and riverways is stark. Removing this waste from the sewerage network can be a nasty job which is easily avoided.

“Our message is simple: only the 3 Ps, pee, poo and paper should be flushed down the toilet. All other items including wipes and other sanitary products should go in the bin even if they are labelled as flushable.

This will reduce the number of sewer blockages, the risk of flooding to homes and businesses and the risk of pollution in the environment harming wildlife such as fish and birds and associated habitats. We have all witnessed the love story unfold between the public and swimming, whether that be at piers, beaches, lakes or rivers. A small change in our flushing behaviour can make a big difference to our natural environment – put wipes, cotton bud sticks and sanitary items in the bin and not down the toilet.”

Speaking about the campaign, Sinead McCoy, Clean Coasts said: “The Think Before You Flush campaign, through education and awareness, aims to prevent items like wipes, cotton bud sticks and sanitary items washing up on Ireland’s spectacular beaches.

While we have seen a positive improvement in the nation’s flushing behaviour since 2018, one in five adults still admit to regularly flushing unsuitable items down the toilet. By making small changes in our flushing behaviour, we can prevent the harm caused by sewage related litter in our marine environment. We are asking everybody to only flush the 3 P’s – pee, poo and paper – and put everything else in the bin.”

Ends

Waterford City & County Council clears the way for Make Way Day 2022

Every corner of Ireland will be put to the test for basic access issues this Friday, September 30th when the Make Way Day campaign returns, with a testing twist!

Campaign organisers, the Disability Federation of Ireland DFI, have developed an online tool that campaigners can use to test and rate their local area along with using MWD stickers to highlight the issues faces by people.

Mayor of Waterford City and County, Cllr John O’Leary welcomed the return of Make Way Day.  “Make Way Day focuses on individual responsibility and explores what we can all do immediately to help our fellow citizens get from A to B, a very basic right. We in Waterford City and County Council are delighted to work with DFI and support the roll-out of Make Way Day across the city and county.”

“We all share public spaces and we are all entitled to share them equally and safely.  However, for those with a disability, are infirm, visually impaired, or simply unable to manoeuvre obstacles, Make Way Day is about highlighting these issues, making the public aware of them and encouraging a change of behaviour.”

The backbone of the Make Way Day campaign is people with disabilities. An online tool empowers them to survey their area for obstacles and rate its accessibility. It will once again give them the chance to share their frustrations by posting photos of obstacles to social platforms with the hashtag #MakeWayDay22

DFI’s survey of campaigners earlier this year revealed that the most reoccurring obstacles are:

  • Cars parked on footpaths
  • Bins causing obstruction on footpaths
  • Bikes illegally parked

Groups of people with disabilities, their allies, and local Access Groups from Waterford Disability Network will take part.

The tool will be available at www.makewayday.com on Make Way Day,  Friday September 30th. It is easy to use and download to a phone and will be circulated widely on the campaign’s social media platforms.

According to the Disability Federation of Ireland, “Our aim is to have all neighbourhoods join up, to give us one comprehensive map of access in Ireland. We will coordinate all the results. We aim to and feed them back to the right people and work together towards clearer streets.”

-ends-

National Slow Down Day – 07.00hrs on Tuesday 1st March to 07.00hrs on Wednesday 2nd March 2022

An Garda Síochána will conduct a national speed enforcement operation “Slow Down”, supported by the Road Safety Authority (RSA) and other stakeholders, for a 24 hour period from 07.00hrs on Tuesday 1st March to 07.00hrs on Wednesday 2nd March 2022.

The aim of “Slow Down day” is to remind drivers of the dangers of speeding, to increase compliance with speed limits and act as a deterrent to driving at excessive or inappropriate speed. The overall objective is to reduce the number of speed related collisions, save lives and reduce injuries on our roads.

Excessive and inappropriate speed is a major contributory factor in road traffic collisions, confirmed by an RSA report on fatal collisions between 2008 and 2012 which found that excessive speed was a contributory factor in almost one third of all fatal collisions during that time. The higher the speed, the greater the likelihood is of a collision happening and the more severe the outcome of that collision.

Chief Superintendent Michael Hennebry Garda National Roads Policing Bureau said: “Firstly I would like to thank the majority of those who travel within the speed limits. However, our enforcement operations continue to detect motorists traveling at speeds significantly above the posted speed limits. This reckless behaviour poses a serious risk not just to the motorists themselves, but to all the road users, especially vulnerable pedestrians and cyclists. This is not just about speeding enforcement detections. It’s about saving lives”.

As a general rule a 1% reduction in average speed will bring about a 4% reduction in fatal collisions, and this is why reducing motorists’ speed is essential to improving road safety.

Chief Superintendent Hennebry continued:- I’m appealing to all road users to support us in our efforts to keep everybody safe on our roads.  Please slow down, check your speed, drive safely, not only on National Slow Down Day, but every day”.

Mr. Sam Waide, CEO, Road Safety Authority, said:- “Excessive speed continues to be a leading contributory factor in fatal and serious injury collisions in Ireland and internationally. It has been estimated that 30% of fatal collisions are the result of speeding or inappropriate speed. Evidence shows that many drivers are choosing to speed in our towns, villages and on rural roads. The RSA’s Free Speed observational study found that half of all drivers (52%) were observed speeding on urban roads and over a quarter (27%) were speeding on rural roads. This National Slow Down Day, and indeed every day, please remember the faster you drive, the more likely you are to crash which could result in death or serious injury. Slow down – drive at a speed that is appropriate to the conditions and your experience and remember a speed limit is not a target.”

The operation will consist of high visibility speed enforcement in 1322 speed enforcement zones. We will also deliver the message through various media channels to remind people of the potential impact on families and communities of speeding.

Government Departments, Local Authorities, Public and private sector fleet operators are invited to participate in the initiative by circulating to employees the key message of “Slow Down” and, whether driving for business or private purposes, to always drive within the speed limit and at a speed appropriate to the prevailing conditions.

 

Hidden Disability parking spaces at Scanlan’s Yard

Waterford City and County Council has installed two Hidden Disability Car Parking Spaces in Scanlan’s Yard in Dungarvan, Co. Waterford.

The car parking spaces, introduced in September last year, are easily identified with a bright yellow sunflower on a green background.  The sunflower has become internationally recognised as the symbol of hidden disabilities.

As not all disabilities are visible, or immediately obvious, the car parking spaces are in a safe location, not immediately located beside the road and are the same dimensions as a Wheelchair accessible parking space.

Fergus Galvin, Director of Services, Waterford City and County Council explained, “Many disabilities are not always visible such as autism, acquired brain injury, sight or hearing impairment, or learning difficulties.  Those with hidden disabilities, and their families or carers may need a little extra time or assistance getting into and out of their cars safely.”

“Some of the users may not qualify for a Blue Badge, so these courtesy parking spaces provide a safe and accessible place to park.  While the hidden disability spaces require paid parking, with the Pay and Display ticket machine located close to these spaces, we would ask the general public to respect the spaces and leave them for those with hidden disabilities.”

Waterford City and County Council is the first local authority in Ireland to introduce hidden disability spaces and following such a positive response intends to introduce more in the city and county in the near future.

According to Hidden Disabilities, across Ireland, 1 in 5 people live with some form of disability and 80% of these are non-visible, which is just under one million people who are living with a non-visible disability.

-ENDS-

RSA and An Garda Síochána highlight life-changing impact of drink driving at Christmas and New Year

  • 83 fatalities and 709 serious injuries* in Christmas / New Year period over last five years
  • Morning after highlighted as one in four drivers admit to driving over the limit the morning afterϮ
  • Drivers reminded that all drink driving offences carry a disqualification
  • Almost 4,500 drivers arrested for drink driving to date in 2021

Thursday, 25 November – The Road Safety Authority (RSA) and An Garda Síochána have called on drivers to act responsibly and to not be tempted to drink and drive this Christmas and New Year period. This year’s Christmas and New Year road safety appeal was launched at An Garda Síochána Headquarters in Dublin and focuses on the dangers of driving under the influence of alcohol and the devastating loss of life and serious injuries it can cause.

Research published by the RSA and An Garda Síochána at the launch showed that over the last five years there were 83* fatalities and 709* serious injuries over the Christmas and New Year period. This means that an average of 17* people die and 142* are seriously injured each year at this time. Almost seven out of ten fatalities were male, while almost two thirds of serious injuries were male. The time period 4pm to 8pm was highlighted as the highest risk for fatalities. Serious injuries tended to occur predominantly late afternoon/evening, with over half (51%*) occurring from 12pm through to 8pm.

Minister of State at the Department of Transport, Hildegarde Naughton said: “While the majority of drivers don’t drink and drive there are still some who persist in this dangerous behaviour. Research from 2013-2017 shows that 36% of drivers killed had a positive toxicology for alcohol. To anyone who thinks it’s ok to drive after drinking alcohol I say you need to understand that if you commit a drink driving offence you will face disqualification from driving for a minimum of three months. Think about how a driving ban would impact your daily life. You will no longer be able to drive to work, drive to the gym or drop the kids off to school. If you are planning on having a drink this festive season or anytime, remember that alcohol and driving do not mix. Designate a driver organise a taxi, hackney, minibus or use public transport.”

Liz O’Donnell, Chairperson of the Road Safety Authority said: “Christmas is meant to be one of the happiest times of the year where loved ones gather and memories are made. Unfortunately, every Christmas we see the devastating impact drink-driving has on families. They are reminded of the heart-breaking reality of drink driving every day of the year, but particularly at Christmas by the empty chair at the dinner table where a loved one should be sitting. Drink-driving is a choice it doesn’t happen by accident. Your choice to drink and drive could have lasting consequence. At best you could lose your licence at worst you could be responsible for someone’s death or serious injury, leaving families devastated. Look, its simply not worth the risk. So, make the right choice for you, your family and friends this Christmas and every day and never, ever drink and drive.”

Deputy Commissioner, Ann Marie McMahon, An Garda Síochána said: “This weekend marks the start of the six week Christmas and New Year road safety enforcement campaign by An Garda Síochána. An Garda Síochána will be conducting Mandatory Intoxicant Testing checkpoints around the country, to detect irresponsible drivers who drive under the influence of either alcohol or drugs or a combination of both. We will also be targeting other lifesaver offences including speeding, not wearing seat belts and mobile phone use by drivers. Members of An Garda Síochána will also focus on unaccompanied driving by learner drivers.”

Deputy Commissioner McMahon continued, “Unfortunately drink driving is still a problem on Irish roads. 4,453 drivers have been arrested on suspicion of drunk driving and 3,333 have been arrested for drug driving this year to date. This is almost 166 drivers arrested each week for these offences. This Christmas and New Year, we are appealing to motorists to drive safely and under no circumstances drive under the influence of alcohol or drugs. 120 people have lost their lives on the roads this year and members of An Garda Síochána have had to deliver this devastating news to their families. We don’t want to have to deliver this news to your family this Christmas.”

Professor Cusack, Head of the Medical Bureau of Road Safety, said: “Alcohol is a Depressant drug. Drink it and, after it passes through the liver where it is detoxified, some of the alcohol will hit the brain within minutes. The skills most critical to driving – the brain’s ability to observe, interpret and process information from the eyes and other senses – are impaired by alcohol even at the low levels.”

He added that, “While detection of drug driving has increased substantially in recent years, alcohol remains the commonest intoxicant detected in drivers. In 2020, 94% of drivers, who following arrest provided an evidential breath sample for alcohol analysis, had alcohol detected in their breath. Combining Breath, Blood and Urine alcohol positive samples it is notable that 88% of those samples have alcohol concentrations greater than the legal limit of 50mg/100ml blood equivalent, 67% of drivers have alcohol concentration over 100mg/100ml blood equivalent and 42% of drivers have levels greater than 150mg/100ml blood equivalent. While all age groups (drivers 16-83 years old) are well represented in drink driving detections. Most arrests for drink driving in males is evenly spread across the late teen to mid-forty age categories, while female arrests peak in the 35 to 44 age group. Drink driving is not going away and detection of it has increased.”

Warning of the danger of drink driving the morning after Mr. Sam Waide, CEO, Road Safety Authority said: “The morning after is a real danger zone for drink driving. A previous analysis of Garda Síochána Investigation Files for fatal collisions, by the RSA, shows that 11% of fatal collisions, in which a driver had consumed alcohol, occurred between 7am and 11am. Our own research also shows that one in four drivers admit to driving over the limit the morning afterϮ. There is no hard and fast rule about when it is safe to drive the morning after if you have been drinking the previous night. But motorists should allow at least one hour per standard drink for the alcohol to clear their system. A standard drink is a half-pint, a small glass of wine or a standard measure of spirits. Also, if drinking at home, you may be unknowingly drinking larger measures and therefore increasing the risk of being unsafe to drive the following morning. The key is never to take chances, don’t risk it, you could end up losing your licence or worse.”

Drivers are also being reminded that the Coca Cola Designated driver campaign is running again this year. The scheme offers free soft drinks and water to anyone acting as a designated driver on a night out with friends or family. In addition, Coca Cola has also teamed up with Q-Park cark parks to offer free parking for designated drivers in Dublin, Cork, Galway and Belfast.

The HSE has a useful website called askaboutalcohol.ie which is full of very valuable resources on the impact of alcohol on driving and drivers are encouraged to visit the site for more information on the subject.

ENDS

‘Feeding your 4 – 9 year old’ with Paediatric Dietitian Cathy Monaghan

Learn how to make mealtimes a more positive family time for your 4-9 year old in this free Zoom webinar with Paediatric Dietitian, Cathy Monaghan on Tuesday 30th November at 11 am.

Places are strictly limited. To register for free, please click here.

Your 4 – 9 year old child is getting more and more independent but they still depend on you as a parent for the structure of meals and to decide what is on the menu. This webinar will show you how to provide simple, balanced meals and snacks for your child to grow in a way that’s right for them, concentrate during school and partake in activities that they enjoy. It is aimed at parents or carers of children 4-9 years.

The webinar format means that your screen is not on so you can relax from wherever you join from! Questions are submitted via the chat box or on discussion at the end. A recording of the webinar and support materials are emailed to you shortly afterwards.

Cathy is a Senior Paediatric Dietitian in CHI @ Temple Street with over 15 years’ experience. She established ‘weaning.ie’ in 2016 to provide busy parents with evidenced-based education and support from introducing solids to feeding a family. She is registered with the INDI and CORU.

This webinar is part of the Waterford Healthy Ireland at your Library initiative. For more information, please go to our website here.

For more information, please phone 0761 102141 or email library@waterfordcouncil.ie

Keep Well this Winter: Nutrition tips with Aoife Hearne

Join registered dietitian, broadcaster and author, Aoife Hearne to hear her expert nutrition tips on how to keep well this winter for you and all your family in this free Zoom webinar on Tuesday 9th November at 7 pm.

To register for free, please click here.

A recording of this webinar will be available to view through our Library Facebook page for up to 24hrs after this event.

This webinar is part of the Waterford Healthy Ireland at your Library initiative. For more information, please go to our website here, phone 0761 102974 or email library@waterfordouncil.ie.

Aoife Hearne is a Registered Dietitian and a member of the Irish Nutrition and Dietetic Institute, the professional body for Dietitians in Ireland. She is well known for her role as the leading nutrition expert on RTÉ One’s Operation Transformation. The IFTA winning health and fitness show has a viewership in excess of 600,000 every year. In 2020, Aoife took part in a special COVID-19 series of Operation Transformation called Keeping Well Apart. Aoife previously wrote a weekly column in The Irish Examiner where she looked at a different aspect of childhood nutrition each week.

In 2016, Aoife released her book The Plan . In this, she brings together recipes and practical advice needed to reach and maintain a healthy weight for life. As well as delicious, accessible breakfasts, lunches and dinners, The Plan contains expert advice and strategies for healthy living and is available to borrow through your local library. Aoife regularly works with Bord Bia across a number of their key events.

Waterford City and County Council encourages public to enjoy bonfire-free Halloween

With Halloween approaching Waterford City and County Council is appealing to the public to be aware of the hazards of bonfires and is also urging businesses not to supply any waste material to persons who do not hold a valid waste collection permit.

Chief Fire Office, Niall Curtin issued a warning regarding the dangers of bonfires.  “Last year, brigades from Waterford Fire Service attended 46 bonfires and other outdoor fires on Halloween night and the two weeks leading up to it.  Bonfires are dangerous, potentially leading to burns, inhalation of toxic fumes and injury from exploding cylinders and canisters. They cause significant damage to property and public amenity space.

Unfortunately, on occasion we have been faced with anti-social behaviour at these fires that has hindered fire personnel doing their jobs in a safe manner. I would urge businesses and the public to do their utmost to ensure they do not facilitate such fires. Please report the building of bonfires or storage of bonfire material to Waterford City and County Council.”

The burning of waste in bonfires, and particularly the burning of highly combustible materials may lead to serious injuries or fatalities.  Raymond Moloney, Environment Department has requested that businesses or members of the public do not supply waste material to anyone who does not hold a valid waste collection permit.

“The uncontrolled burning of waste, particularly in bonfires, is illegal and releases toxic pollutants into the air, which are known to be damaging to our health and environment.  The use of accelerants on bonfires can pose a significant safety risk and threat to the public.  We would urge the public to report materials being hoarded such as pallets, tyres, combustible waste or old furniture, by getting in touch with the Council’s Waste Enforcement Section.”

In an effort to encourage bonfire-free Halloween events, Waterford City and County Council’s Estates Management Department is working with residents’ associations throughout the city and county to create alternative, fun and safe Halloween celebrations for children and families.

Eamonn O’ Leary, Estate Management Team said, “We are engaging with local estates to highlight alternate Halloween activities for younger kids and will be running a painting competition as well as a spooky Halloween crossword competition in association with the Garda Schools Programme.

We’re encouraging parents and guardians to ensure that if children are wearing dark Halloween costumes, they carry a torch or use reflective aids or hi-vis clothing so they will be seen by motorists and cyclists. Our Estate management team is also reminding parents to be aware of elderly residents within our Estates and remind younger people to be aware of the vulnerability to noise.  Pets can become stressed by loud noises caused by bangers and bonfires so make sure your furry friend is kept indoors in a safe and in a secure place, and above all enjoy the tricks and treats safely.”

Members of public are also advised not to buy, use or supply fireworks. Illegal fireworks may be manufactured without safety standards and can cause serious damage to users, particularly children. Parents should monitor their children and ensure they do not play with fireworks. Throughout the country, every year children end up tragically injured and often scarred for life, after using illegal fireworks.

To report the storage and collection of materials for bonfires call Waterford City and County Council on 0761 102020.  Report fireworks to the Garda Confidential Line on 1800 666 111.